State of New Jersey

Governor Phil Murphy

New Jersey Reacts to Governor Phil Murphy’s Fiscal Year 2019 Budget

Trenton – Editorial boards and columnists from across New Jersey applauded Governor Phil Murphy’s bold budget for Fiscal Year 2019. The Governor’s proposed budget puts New Jersey on the path to a stronger and fairer future through investments in education, mass transit, and working families. The budget also prioritizes fairness for all by upholding the promise of the state’s pension contributions, raising the property tax deduction cap under the state's income tax, closing corporate tax loopholes, and creating a millionaire’s tax to ensure everyone pays their fair share.

See below for reactions to Governor Murphy’s budget:

“On Tuesday, Christie's successor announced a $242-million increase in state funding for NJ Transit and muzzled any talk of fare increases for 2019. And judging by the other steps Gov. Murphy has already taken - appointing real transit experts, purging patronage hires, and ordering an audit - he has shown that he is ready to strap on a helmet and tackle this neglected, abused and understaffed agency that is responsible for moving 910,000 passengers every day.” –Star-Ledger Editorial

“While there might be some hand-wringing in Trenton among fiscal hawks in response to Gov. Phil Murphy’s proposed big-spending, high-tax budget, one group that will not be complaining much is the state’s public education community, which had been starved for resources for several years. Indeed, former Gov. Chris Christie spent much more time publicly denigrating teachers and their unions than he did trying to consider ways to properly fund public schools.” –Bergen Record Editorial

"Murphy said he intends to have a hands-on role in matters of economic development, calling himself 'the head of … sales' for New Jersey. 'So, if you’re looking for the head of the sales department, call me,' he said. That’s the kind of direct approach New Jersey desperately needs right now." –ROI-NJ Editorial

"Starting next spring, students from families with incomes below $45,000 will be able to attend community college tuition-free. That is only a down payment for what Murphy said is his ultimate goal: Making New Jersey the first state in the union to provide free schooling from pre-K through two years of community college." –Asbury Park Press Editorial

"For those anxious to see Gov. Phil Murphy chart a different course than former Gov. Chris Christie at every turn, the budget plan Murphy unveiled last week offered plenty of predictable, encouraging elements — spending increases, tax hikes, and an overall fiscal policy that would certainly qualify as progressive. –myCentralJersey.com Editorial

"In his first budget address to the people of New Jersey, Gov. Phil Murphy decided it was better to go bold, or not go at all. In an enthusiastic, nearly hourlong speech, Murphy described his plan as 'realistic and responsible.' He outlined a host of big-ticket investments that he promised would make New Jersey more competitive economically and more livable for all residents for years to come." –Bergen Record Editorial

"Gov. Phil Murphy wants to increase school aid that was frozen for years under Chris Christie, by a median of 5 percent per district - the biggest bump in almost a decade. That's good news." –Star-Ledger Editorial

"Murphy's forecasters are expecting the millionaires and sales tax hikes to generate nearly 66 percent of new revenue to finance the lofty, liberal wish list Murphy campaigned on last year — beefed up aid for schools, public employee pension payments, the rebirth of New Jersey Transit and the downpayment of a multi-year dream of expanding preschool education and offering free community college tuition." –Charles Stile, NorthJersey.com

"It is a bipartisan tradition in New Jersey for governors to leave their successors a mess to clean up, but Christie took it to a new level. Murphy has little choice but to make meaty investments in transit and schools, which Christie mercilessly starved, and in the pensions system, which was a mess long before either man arrived." –Tom Moran, Star-Ledger

Back to Top